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5 Things to do when you suspect vermiculite in your insulation (Zonolite)

For many years people have lived and worked with a danger lurking all around. This danger is known as insulation. Yes, insulation. Years ago when vermiculite was mined in Libby, MT most of it was contaminated with asbestos. Zonolite is the trade name for this asbestos tainted insulation, but it may have been sold under other names also.
There are 5 things the EPA recommends you do, if you have or suspect you have vermiculite insulation (https://www.epa.gov/asbestos/protect-your-family-asbestos-contaminated-vermiculite-insulation)

1) Leave vermiculite insulation undisturbed in your attic or in your walls.
2) Do not store boxes or other items in your attic if it contains vermiculite insulation.
3) Do not allow children to play in an attic with vermiculite insulation.
4) Do not attempt to remove the insulation yourself.
5) Hire a professional asbestos contractor if you plan to remodel or conduct renovations that would disturb the vermiculite in your attic or walls to make sure the material is safely handled and/or removed.

The key is to prevent or minimize the chance that asbestos fibers can become airborne and expose people in the area. This would include working in the attic to run cables, add/change antennas, installing skylights, etc – whether the work is done by the homeowner or by a contractor.

Remember this insulation can also be found in the walls, so as you remodel be very careful when creating holes in the walls and ceilings to remove/install electrical outlets, run wires, hang lamps, hang pictures, etc. These types of activities can lead to vermiculite becoming disturbed and creating a hazardous situation.

By | 2017-02-27T14:39:15+00:00 February 27th, 2017|Asbestos Abatement|0 Comments

How is asbestos removed?

In general, when certified contractors remove asbestos the idea is to keep people safe by containing the area, minimizing the amount of material that becomes airborne and properly disposing of the asbestos containing material. Below are high level steps that are taken to remove asbestos containing materials. Federal and state regulations may vary the steps in certain circumstances and depending on the amount and types of materials require additional or less stringent controls.

The first step is to understand what material is asbestos containing and develop a plan to remove it. If the amount of material to be removed is greater than the trigger levels the project must be appropriately reviewed and permitted by the state.

Using certified workers and supervisors, a proper containment is built using poly sheeting around the area containing the material to be removed. This is done to ensure that while working asbestos fibers are not released into the surrounding environment. This containment includes access and egress points for personnel and the material that is removed. While removal is actively conducted in this containment, the workers are required to wear proper protective equipment, such as respirators and suits, to ensure they are exposed to minimal amounts of asbestos fibers. Additionally, the air from within the containment is filtered before being exhausted outside the containment. This technique constantly draws clean air in from outside the containment and filters the air in the work space. The differential in air pressure across the containment walls is constantly monitored and ensures that the asbestos fibers do not escape the containment.

While working on the removal of the asbestos material, the work space is constantly wetted down to reduce the amount of asbestos fibers that stay airborne. HEPA vacuums are also used to clean up fibers. The work space is constantly kept clean as removal is taking place. Each type of material to be removed must be approached in such a way to limit the amount of airborne fibers produced.

Throughout the project, visual inspections are coordinated with a third party agency. Also, air quality is constantly monitored both on the personnel conducting the work as well as background air. This is critical to ensure the safety of the workers as well as maintaining a safe environment surrounding the work area.

Once the work removing the asbestos material is complete and the appropriate inspections conducted, the containment is removed and all the waste is taken to a landfill that accepts asbestos material for disposal.

Quite a bit of training and experience is necessary to safely remove asbestos containing materials. The end result is a safer environment that has better air quality and is forever free from those materials that were removed.

By | 2017-01-23T09:38:50+00:00 January 23rd, 2017|Asbestos Abatement|0 Comments